Pancreatic Cancer

Pathophysiology

Like most solid tumor types, pancreatic cancer arises from the dysregulated proliferation of a given cell type. Nearly all pancreatic tumors (93%) develop in exocrine tissue1 arising from cells lining pancreatic ducts2 and are characterized by an average of 63 genetic alterations per tumor and dysfunction of 12 key signaling pathways.3 In addition, pancreatic tumors are poorly vascularized and often surrounded by a dense desmoplastic stroma.4

Landscape

Most patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed with inoperable disease, and the goals of therapy include alleviating symptoms and prolonging survival.5-9 Research areas include the identification of novel combinations to lessen the tumor burden.10 Investigational therapies include the combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors with inhibitors of tumor-associated macrophage activation and survival11-13 and systemic chemotherapy.14

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The safety and efficacy of the agents and/or uses under investigation have not been established. There is no guarantee that the agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated.

In Our Pipeline

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Clinical trial information is sourced from ClinicalTrials.gov. Information is updated manually as clinical trials are published. The efficacy and safety of the agents and/or uses under investigation have not been established. There is no guarantee that the agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated.

References

  1. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2019. Atlanta, GA. https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/annual-cancer-facts-and-figures/2019/cancer-facts-and-figures-2019.pdf.
  2. Hidalgo M. N Engl J Med. 2010;362:1605-1617 PMID: 20427809
  3. Jones S, et al. Science. 2008;321:1801-1806. PMID: 18772397
  4. Feig C, et al. Clin Cancer Res. 2012;18:4266-4276. PMID: 22896693
  5. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. V1.2019.
  6. National Cancer Institute. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Cancer Stat Facts: Pancreatic Cancer. https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/pancreas.html. Accessed March 30, 2019.
  7. Al-Hawary M, et al. Radiology. 2014;270:248-260. PMID: 24354378
  8. Tempero MA, et al. J Natl Compr Canc Netw. 2014;12:1083-1093. PMID: 25099441
  9. MD Anderson Cancer Center. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. https://www.mdanderson.org/documents/for-physicians/algorithms/cancer-treatment/ca-treatment-pancreatic-web-algorithm.pdf. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  10. Takahashi C, et al. J Gastrointest Oncol. 2018;9:910-921. PMID: 30505594
  11. Wainberg Z, et al. J ImmunoTher Cancer. 2017;5(suppl 3) [abstract O42].
  12. Calvo A, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2018;36(suppl) [abstract 3014].
  13. Carleton M, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2018;36(suppl) [abstract 3020].
  14. Wainberg ZA, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2019;37(suppl 4) [abstract 298].