Multiple Sclerosis

Pathophysiology

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that causes demyelination and neuroaxonal loss.1,2 The etiology of MS is not well understood, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to trigger immune-mediated damage to the CNS. In MS lesions, the blood-brain barrier is disrupted, allowing entry of peripheral immune cells into the CNS.1,3,4 As a result, microglial cells upregulate MHC class I and II molecules and secrete cytokines and chemokines. This triggers CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic-like cells to infiltrate the CNS. The presence of these cells in the CNS leads to demyelination, the formation of CNS lesions, and neurodegeneration.1,5,6

Landscape

Ongoing research for MS therapy includes monoclonal antibodies and therapies that target autoreactive T and B cells, immunomodulators that may decrease the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, tyrosine kinase inhibitors that regulate mast cells, and hematopoietic stem cell transplant.7

Read more Collapse

The safety and efficacy of the agents and/or uses under investigation have not been established. There is no guarantee that the agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated.

View Molecular Pathways

In Our Pipeline

Choose filters to find specific trials in the BMS pipeline.

Filter trials by:

STATUS

PHASE

trials
View Multiple Sclerosis Trials Through Our Pipeline

To search for clinical trials with other recruiting statuses,
please visit bolderscience.com.

Clinical trial information is sourced from ClinicalTrials.gov. Information is updated manually as clinical trials are published. The efficacy and safety of the agents and/or uses under investigation have not been established. There is no guarantee that the agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated.

References

  1. Hunter SF. Am J Manag Care. 2016;22(6 suppl):s141-s50. PMID: 27356023
  2. Tuosto L. Austin J. Mult Scler Neuroimmunol. 2015;2:1009-1018.
  3. Duffy SS, et al. Mult Scler Int. 2014;2014:285245. PMID: 25374694
  4. Prinz M, Priller J. Nat Neurosci. 2017;20:136-144. PMID: 28092660
  5. Luo C, et al. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2017;13:1661-1667. PMID: 28721047
  6. Dargahi N, et al. Brain Sci. 2017;7:78. PMID: 28686222
  7. Hart FM, Bainbridge J. Am J Manag Care. 2016;22(6 suppl):s159-70. PMID: 27356025