Lymphoma

Pathophysiology

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) represent a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders that arise in mature B lymphocytes (≈ 90% of cases), T lymphocytes (≈ 10%), or natural killer (NK) cells (< 1%).1-3 The molecular pathogenesis of NHL is driven by a variety of chromosomal abnormalities and somatic mutations that alter the epigenetic landscape, gene expression, and cellular function of lymphocytes.4-9

Landscape

Research areas in NHL management include monitoring for recurrence, prevention of late-stage treatment complications, and evaluation of rare subtypes, since patients’ needs vary widely based on subtype.10 The median age of patients with NHL has increased over the last 2 decades, and patients may have significant comorbidities, complicating treatment.1 The diverse pathophysiology of NHL subtypes has led to an equally heterogeneous treatment landscape. Therapeutic options for patients with NHL are primarily based on a patient’s subtype, stage of disease, and other factors at diagnosis and may include, but are not limited to, chemotherapies, immunomodulatory agents, cellular therapies (eg, chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies), monoclonal antibodies (eg, anti-CD20 and anti-CD30), stem cell transplants (autologous or allogeneic), immune regulators (eg, corticosteroids), and proteasome inhibitors.1,10

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The safety and efficacy of the agents and/or uses under investigation have not been established. There is no guarantee that the agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated.

In Our Pipeline

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Clinical trial information is sourced from ClinicalTrials.gov. Information is updated manually as clinical trials are published. The efficacy and safety of the agents and/or uses under investigation have not been established. There is no guarantee that the agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated.

References

  1. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. B-Cell Lymphomas. V2.2019.
  2. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. T-Cell Lymphomas. V2.2019.
  3. ASCO. Cancer.net. https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/lymphoma-non-hodgkin/subtypes. Accessed March 28, 2019.
  4. Morin RD, et al. Nature. 2011;476:298-303. PMID: 21796119
  5. Lenz G, Staudt LM. N Engl J Med. 2010;362:1417-1429. PMID: 20393178
  6. Ghielmini M, Zucca E. Blood. 2009;114:1469-1476. PMID: 19556426
  7. Gaulard P, de Leval L. Semin Hematol. 2014;51:5-16. PMID: 24468311
  8. Wong HK. Discov Med. 2013;16:71-78. PMID: 23998443
  9. Jares P, et al. J Clin Invest. 2012;122:3416-3423. PMID: 23023712
  10. Armitage JO, et al. Lancet. 2017;390:298-310. PMID: 28153383